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Traffic Ticket Lawyer

The Lawyer’s Secrets to Beating Traffic Tickets

Before I was a traffic lawyer, I had been wondering how a lawyer could repair traffic tickets. I ‘d say, “I was driving. I got arrested. How can they get me out of that?” But I was one and worked that out. And it’s not really that complicated, to be honest. Yet, unfortunately, for it to be successful it requires a law degree. The key is getting enough details to beat the ticket, discovering administrative mistakes that break the ticket, or making things seem like you’ve got plenty to break the ticket and the lawyer doesn’t want to spend his time. And you must inquire politely, occasionally. Feel free to visit www.louisianaspeedingticket.com/do-old-traffic-tickets-go-away-eventually/ for more details.

I’ve set a traffic ticket today for starters. This was a speeding penalty so I expected it to be changed to a non-moving offense (basically that would not change insurance premiums on the car). When they got their speeding ticket, the person obtained a DUI and the DUI and speeding ticket were dealt with separately. The DUI was done, and the lawyer nevertheless wanted the speeding warrant.

The ticket was set for hearing, I appeared, and before the hearing I spoke to the prosecutor (this is something that happens all the time and is where most criminal defense deals are made) and explained to the prosecutor that my client received a DUI with the speed ticket and that the DUI was already taken care of (reduced to negligent driving) and asked the prosecutor what we could do. She decided to minimize it after having discussed it, and voila, it was over!

Many times, obtaining evidence takes the challenge of litigation (although in certain instances it requires a lot of jury wins to obtain outcomes), so that also relies on the particular circumstances of the situation. That’s why I said having positive outcomes (or tons of traffic tickets) needs a law degree. A lawyer has the background to figure out the rules and practices, to see the holes in the case of the prosecution, and to express those weaknesses in a way that the prosecutor understands. I’m not saying you can’t do this alone, I’m just saying it’s a lot harder.